648 2 0 0 OA ジャムシード王

著者
井本 英一
出版者
一般社団法人 日本オリエント学会
雑誌
オリエント (ISSN:00305219)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.10, no.1-2, pp.213-235,257, 1967 (Released:2010-03-12)

According to Yasna 32.8 Yima divides the flesh of the bull among men. The author thinks that it is one of rituals of the New Year and Yima himself is the lord of the sacrificial feast with which the New Year festival sets in.It is supposed that Yima's festival took place round the Vara, an instance of which is the Ka'ba i Zardošt and there held successive Achaemenian kings, who were Yimas also, the ceremonies of accession.

13 0 0 0 OA 女の祭り

著者
井本 英一
出版者
大阪外国語大学
雑誌
イラン研究 (ISSN:18800033)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.3, pp.39-76, 2007
著者
井本 英一
出版者
大阪外国語大学
雑誌
イラン研究 (ISSN:18800033)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.2, pp.1-39, 2006
著者
井本 英一
出版者
一般社団法人 日本オリエント学会
雑誌
オリエント (ISSN:00305219)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.26, no.2, pp.13-30, 1983 (Released:2010-03-12)

New Persian sada was derived from Middle Pers. *sadag/*satak, which was derived from Old Pers. *sataka-. OPers. *sataka- meant ‘the hundredth’ that is, ‘the hundredth day.’In Shahnameh several references to sada together with the No Ruz festival are found. Originally the sada festival was held on the hundredth day from the winter solstice, say, about Farvardin 10th; it lasted to Farvandin 13th (April 2nd).The Easter fires are also held about almost the same time and a new fire is lit on the Easter eve.The ancient Chinese held the Han-shih-tsieh _??__??__??_ ‘festival of eating cold food’ on the 100th, 103rd or 105th day from the winter solstice. It was held from April 2nd to April 5th. During the three days all fires were put out and a new fire was lit on the last day. The day was the last day of an ancient spring New Year.Sada was the last festival of the No Ruz festival and the new fire was lit on that day.
著者
井本 英一
出版者
一般社団法人 日本オリエント学会
雑誌
オリエント (ISSN:00305219)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.12, no.3-4, pp.1-22,220, 1969 (Released:2010-03-12)

The four-eyed dog is found in the Yama cycle of the Rig Veda, where two four-eyed dogs lead the dead to the fathers in heaven. In the Avestan Videvdat, however, a white dog, spotted with yellow on the ears, plays an important role in the funeral rites, and among the modern Parsees it appears at the Sag-did ceremonies again.Ethnography supports the dog and spottedness symbolism in the wide territorial extent and requires some correction of views which, for example, the late Rev. M. Modi has expounded.Originally the two dogs represented the death and the rebirth, which later have been incorporated in one dog with spotted colour and four eyes.The writer also interprets, against Prof. P. Thieme, Rig Vedic çvagbnin- as one who playing dice at the rite of passage gains two aces, a deuce-ace, and sacrifices the four-eyed dog in order to become sacred, renovate oneself and get rebirth.

5 0 0 0 OA 銭の話(1)

著者
井本 英一
出版者
桃山学院大学
雑誌
桃山学院大学人間科学 (ISSN:09170227)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.10, pp.57-76, 1996-01-30

4 0 0 0 OA 捨て子と再生

著者
井本 英一
出版者
一般社団法人 日本オリエント学会
雑誌
オリエント (ISSN:00305219)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.29, no.1, pp.1-16, 1986-09-30 (Released:2010-03-12)

Eiichi IMOTO, Abandonment of Infants and their Rebirth: Infants were abandoned in the mountains or on the water. They were never slain but reared up by men, animals or birds, and eventually returned to their native place.For example, Cyrus the Great, in his babyhood, was given to a cowherd at the foot of a mountain. Dara, a son of Humay, was, according to the Shahnama of Firdausi, abandoned by the water and found by a washerman. When he grew into a boy, Dara realized that he was of royal descent. He came home and was enthroned.Thus, infants were supposed to go to the world of totems and return to their native place endowed with a supernatural power.
著者
井本 英一 Eiichi Imoto 桃山学院大学文学部(元)
出版者
桃山学院大学総合研究所
雑誌
桃山学院大学キリスト教論集 = St. Andrew's University Journal of Christian Studies (ISSN:0286973X)
巻号頁・発行日
no.40, pp.109-137, 2004-02-20

On New Year's Day Suwa-taisha Shrine has a ritual to make sacrifice of two frogs. Visitors to the Dual Shrines of Ise, Naiku Shrine and Geku Shrine, offer frogs of pottery on the rocky altar by the sea. Pilgrims to Santiago di Compostella have offered votive picture tablets of frog to the temple. Witches would give a dinner party at the night of Walpurgis on the mount Brocken at the beginning of May day.Frogs were main dish then.Witches were goddesses of pre-Christian period. Suwa-taisha's sacred pole with strips of white papers on top, Ise shrine's center pole with various color strips on top, and May pole with various color strips down from top are totem poles. Frogs were representation of ancestors or gods. Frog-shaped lamps of Roman, Coptic or Ethiopic Church were souls of ancestors or gods. Gods or goddesses ate the offering of frogs at the beginning of the year to make themselves resurrect.

3 0 0 0 OA 青の色彩表象

著者
井本 英一 Eiichi Imoto 桃山学院大学文学部(元)
雑誌
国際文化論集 = INTERCULTURAL STUDIES (ISSN:09170219)
巻号頁・発行日
no.36, pp.1-32, 2007-06-20

The color blue is seen on the borders of the inside and outside of a home, in this world and the next world, so it is the color of the funeral, the marriage and other rites. Messengers from the other world used to wear blue clothes, and maids or servants of this world had blue clothes on. The executioner's clothes had something blue and the condemned criminal's had, too. A sacrifice, human or animal, had something blue. A man on his deathbed would change his usual clothes for blue ones. The dead person was thought to be an offering to the gods. The color blue was the symbol of giving vigor and energy to the god. The blue colors were used from the royal divine families to the common people. On the New Year, Emperors of China and Japan put on blue clothes. The Virgin Mary also wore a blue mantle.
著者
井本 英一
出版者
大阪外国語大学
雑誌
大阪外国語大学論集 (ISSN:09166637)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.4, pp.153-160, 1990-12-15

3 0 0 0 OA 不思議の鍋

著者
井本 英一
出版者
桃山学院大学
雑誌
桃山学院大学人間科学 (ISSN:09170227)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.16, pp.1-29, 1999-01-30

Sun Yat-sen, Chinese revolutionary, gave a miraculous pot to Tatsukichiro Horikawa, Japanese nobleman, when he departed from China for Japan after the completion of the revolution. When one rubbes the handles of the pot with water in up to 70 per cent height, a large quantity of mist gushes forth. The pot is kind of the cornu copia which supplies inexhausted food and drink. This kind of pot was considered not as a pot of this world but as that of the world beyond. Loaves and fish of Jesus (Matt. 14. 13-21) were cooked in this pot. The large bronze 'sea' in front of Solomon's temple and the Holy Grail of King Arthur were of the same origin. A miraculous pot belonged to the god of the underwater or the underground world so it was laid out at the entrance of the cave tomb. Ancient blacksmiths needed carbon in melting metals. They sacrificed a human being and put it into the melting pot. The story of the miraculous pot is often connected with the body or the head of the victim. The kingship was represented by the miraculous pot. When the kingship was lost the pot sinked to the depth of the water and was guarded by a dragon god, and anyone who got it out of the water became a new king.
著者
井本 英一 Eiichi IMOTO 桃山学院大学文学部
雑誌
国際文化論集 = INTERCULTURAL STUDIES (ISSN:09170219)
巻号頁・発行日
no.14, pp.77-100, 1996-09-30

The Aramaic version of the story of Ahikar; The story of Heykar (Ahikar) in the Arabian Nights; Ahikar in the Book of Tobit; Ahikar in the Aesop's Fables as a Babylonian vizier; Ahikar in the Old Turkish and the Mongolian versions; custom of killing old men; sheltering of the escaped old men in the cellars; the story of Cyrus the Great of the Persian Empire; abandonment of old men in Korea; an obedient son took back an abandoned old man home; a neighboring king made unreasonable demands upon the king who had ordered to abandon an old man; an old man's wisdom helped the king solve the demands; no mention about the neighboring king making unreasonable demands; Ahikar in the Buddhist versions; Ahikar in the Chinese versions; Ahikar in the Japanese versions; addenda and corrigenda to AT 922A and 981.

2 0 0 0 IR 青の色彩表象

著者
井本 英一 Eiichi Imoto 桃山学院大学文学部(元)
出版者
桃山学院大学総合研究所
雑誌
国際文化論集 = INTERCULTURAL STUDIES (ISSN:09170219)
巻号頁・発行日
no.36, pp.1-32, 2007-06-20

The color blue is seen on the borders of the inside and outside of a home, in this world and the next world, so it is the color of the funeral, the marriage and other rites. Messengers from the other world used to wear blue clothes, and maids or servants of this world had blue clothes on. The executioner's clothes had something blue and the condemned criminal's had, too. A sacrifice, human or animal, had something blue. A man on his deathbed would change his usual clothes for blue ones. The dead person was thought to be an offering to the gods. The color blue was the symbol of giving vigor and energy to the god. The blue colors were used from the royal divine families to the common people. On the New Year, Emperors of China and Japan put on blue clothes. The Virgin Mary also wore a blue mantle.

2 0 0 0 OA 獣皮の禁忌

著者
井本 英一
出版者
一般社団法人 日本オリエント学会
雑誌
オリエント (ISSN:00305219)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.31, no.2, pp.1-17, 1988 (Released:2010-03-12)

The dying person is wrapped up in the animal skin as the dead person is in Iran. The animal skin is of goat or sheep. It would seem that they get spirited wearing the skin of a sacrificed animal.It was the custom of neolithic Egypt to be buried with the animal skin on the body. In the ancient world even the deity needed the animal skin when he was to be full of life. The animal skin revitalized the dead, the deity, and the living as well.The animal sacrifice was not to offer up an animal to the deity but to kill the deity itself. The skin of the animal was full of life. Therefore the dying deity clad in the skin of the sacrificed animal came to life again.
著者
井本 英一 Eiichi IMOTO 桃山学院大学文学部
雑誌
国際文化論集 = INTERCULTURAL STUDIES (ISSN:09170219)
巻号頁・発行日
no.14, pp.77-100, 1996-09-30

The Aramaic version of the story of Ahikar; The story of Heykar (Ahikar) in the Arabian Nights; Ahikar in the Book of Tobit; Ahikar in the Aesop's Fables as a Babylonian vizier; Ahikar in the Old Turkish and the Mongolian versions; custom of killing old men; sheltering of the escaped old men in the cellars; the story of Cyrus the Great of the Persian Empire; abandonment of old men in Korea; an obedient son took back an abandoned old man home; a neighboring king made unreasonable demands upon the king who had ordered to abandon an old man; an old man's wisdom helped the king solve the demands; no mention about the neighboring king making unreasonable demands; Ahikar in the Buddhist versions; Ahikar in the Chinese versions; Ahikar in the Japanese versions; addenda and corrigenda to AT 922A and 981.
著者
井本 英一
出版者
桃山学院大学
雑誌
国際文化論集 (ISSN:09170219)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.22, pp.61-79, 2000-12-20

In 19th-century Korea votive pictures of a tiger or a cock were put on the door or the wall of the imperial palace on the New year's Day. Pictures of a god and a goddess were also put on both the door posts or the entrance to the palace. These animals and gods were the ancestors of the emperor, whence the gardians of the palace. This custom was borrowed from China. In China there was more detailed systems of animals through which the souls of the dead were transmigrated. It was believed that the souls of the dead went into the wall and appeared out of it. People buried the dead body in the wall. The dead, like the living, come to life again on the New year's Day. The votive pictures of the New year's Day were the pictures of the ancestors of the emperor.
著者
井本 英一
出版者
大阪外国語大学
雑誌
大阪外国語大学論集 (ISSN:09166637)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.32, pp.123-164, 2006-02-16

In the ancient world a man would die covered with the skin of an animal only with his face exposed from the skin. Or, a man would die with only the mask of an animal head and a human body. People at that time thought that the man passed away into the world of the ancestors and each ancestor took each animal figure. Totem animals would come to the world of the human beings when the seasons changed to help give them strength to live.
著者
井本 英一
出版者
大阪外国語大学
雑誌
大阪外国語大学論集 (ISSN:09166637)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.2, pp.83-89, 1990-03-31
著者
井本 英一
出版者
桃山学院大学
雑誌
桃山学院大学人間科学 (ISSN:09170227)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.13, pp.1-43, 1997-09-30

A man who has had a near-death experience tells us; he passed through a dark, long tunnel at the end of which a dim light was seen; before entering or leaving the tunnel he saw a river or Styx, a flower garden or a vast field, an old man standing there, and a young girl leading him (the man of near-death experience); he saw a sacred prostitute at the entrance of the tunnel; the old man gave him instruction to go back home or someone from behind called him to go home and get his work done. King Gilgamesh of the Sumero-Akkadian Epos passed through a pitch-dark, long tunnel to see Utnapishtim in order to get an eternal life; Utnapishtim persuaded him to go home though giving him a present of herbs; on his way home from Utnapistim's land a snake stole his herb and got an eternal life for itself. Adam and Eve left the Garden of Eden after eating fruit given by the snake: from Eden a river streamed out from something like the grotto of Pan forking into four rivers; in the times of paganism Adam was Gilgamesh and Eve was a sacred prostitute and the god was Utnapishtim. A Chinese fisherman after sailing upstream found a tunnel at the source of the river in the forest of peach trees in full blossom; he walked into the tunnel and got out of it to find a utopia; an old man told him of the history of the utopia; the fishrman returned home never to come again and find it. Koga Saburo of Japan went through 73 subterranean tunnels and 72 countries; he saw many rivers, gardens, old men (a Buddhist statue), young girls and ancesters; eventually he appeared on the ground transformed into a snake.