著者
田中 里奈
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.71, pp.1-26, 2020-12-15 (Released:2020-12-26)

In 2006, the musical Marie Antoinette was launched from Tokyo. Before the return to Japan in 2018, this work about the French Revolution was performed in Germany, South Korea, and Hungary.Marie Antoinette was originally intended for the export but did not fully follow the trend of megamusical that globally succeeded with the franchise system since the 1980s. Rather, this musical continued to be dedicated to the specific context of popular theater in each performing venue, as seen in the growing trade of musicals between Continental Europe and East Asia in the last few decades. For meeting actual demands and limitations, all the elements including the text and music were constantly overwritten with the approval of the copyright holders.In the chained variations on the principle of flexible adaptation, the authority of the original product, which is connected to the license business of musicals with enormous initial costs, is diminishing. Instead, companies and institutions that have more or less their own financial resources, e.g. from the public sector or the holding company, played a significant role in the survival of the genre within the various and acceleratedly changing sociocultural environments on the performance.
著者
後藤 隆基
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.56, pp.59-75, 2013 (Released:2017-01-06)

Shakespeare the Year Tenpô 12 by INOUE Hisashi (1934-2010) was first staged in 1974. The play attracted attention because of the novel idea of using all of Shakespeare's works in the script, but the evaluation of the premiere was low and the author himself declared the play a failure. However, in 2005, the drama was revised by INOUE himself and directed by NINAGAWA Yukio, and this performance gave Shakespeare the Year Tenpô 12 the opportunity of reappraisal.Usually, criticism on Shakespeare the Year Tenpô 12 is focused on the points of Shakespearean parody. However, though scholars point out the necessity for different interpretations of the play, no concrete thesis of evaluation has been published to date.In this paper, I aim at showing the possibility of a new reading and comprehension from the viewpoint of the sexuality in this drama. The transformation of the sex scenes in Shakespeare the Year Tenpô 12 corresponds with the life of the protagonist Sado no Miyoji and the state of affairs at the location where the plot enfolds, the postal station of Kiyotaki on the road towards Narita. Thus it can be considered that the sexuality forms the base of the theatrical world in this drama.First, I pay attention to the love scenes as sexual representation and consider their part in the plot. Further, I will analyze the murder scenes and finally conclude by clarifying the process where the sexuality moves from the realm of the living to the land of the dead by explaining the relationship between the love scenes and the murder scenes.
著者
埋忠 美沙
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.62, pp.17-33, 2016

This paper discusses Kabukis role as a news media by comparing kabuki performances staged during the Satsuma rebellion (1877) to those concerning the Sino-Japanese war (1894-1895). In previous research, the negative reception of plays on the topic of the Sino-Japanese War has been considered as sign of Kabukis inherent inability in dealing with modern warfare, and the reason why Kabuki turned away from staging plays on contemporary topics. However, the play Okige no kumo harau asagochi (1878) depicted the battles of the Satsuma rebellion, using a script based on newspaper articles, and incorporated realistic details of modern warfare, such as cannons, trumpets, commandments and marches on stage, yet received rave reviews. This paper analyses the success of this play, by comparing it to the play Nihon dai shōri (1894), which used newspaper articles from the Sino-Japanese war as a basis for its script. I will show that, contradictory to what has previously been argued, Meiji period Kabuki was not inherently incapable of dealing with modern warfare, and discuss what implications this has for re-considering Kabuki as one form of news media in the early 20th century.
著者
伊藤 真紀
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.56, pp.21-37, 2013 (Released:2017-01-06)

Since 1948, female Nô performers have been admitted to the Nô Association, and women can now perform at Nô theatres. In few of these performances, however, do women play all the roles. This report considers the remarkable case of the “Awaji Women's Nô,” when a group of some sixty Ôsaka amateur women Nô students traveled to Awaji Island to perform together on a private stage on May 7, 1922.Awaji Women's Nô was a landmark in breaking down a long taboo against females on the Nô stage. Three factors made this unique event possible. First was the sponsorship of MASAOKA Kasaburô (1867-1950), a Nô aficionado from a wealthy Ôsaka family who built a private Nô stage at his estate on Awaji. Second was the active support of professional male Nô instructors of female pupils in the Ôsaka area. Third was the contribution of NAKAYAMA Mitsue, wife of the editor of an Ôsaka Nô journal (Kansai Nôgaku) who was herself a member of the Awaji group and helped promote the event, emphasizing the ways in which the study of Nô could help women promote family values.Awaji Women's Nô was widely reported in the press, and although the precedent was not to be repeated, it helped pave the way for the later reforms that would enable women to perform on the Nô stage.

10 0 0 0 OA 戦時下の能楽

著者
佐藤 和道
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.65, pp.1-17, 2017-11-30 (Released:2017-11-30)

During World War II, it is known that a lot of Nogaku works were newly written in order to encourage the wartime spirit. Among them, Churei (1941) and Miikusabune (1943) have distinctive features in terms of their large-scale performances and social impact. Churei had more than 100 performances after its premiere, touring nationwide from northern Hokkaido to southern Kyushu. Significantly, in 1942 it was presented at Korakuen baseball stadium in front of over 30000 people. In addition, Churei and Miikusabune were widely spread by record, radio, and news documentaries. This seems to be an exceptional case in Nogaku which has historically had a closed form of performance.Why could Churei and Miikusabune become propaganda for the War? Originally Nogaku was supported by a small number of wealthy patrons, so there was no need to assume an unspecified number of spectators. But at the end of the Meiji era, the middle classes such as business people and intellectuals enjoyed as a hobby practicing utai (the chant of Nogaku). Moreover, in the Taisho era there was a “popularization controversy” concernig whether Nogaku should be liberated from specific classes. Furthermore, after the reconstruction from the Grand Kanto Earthquake (1923), the approach of theatre commercialism came to be recognized as necessary for survival.This paper discusses the “commercialization of Nogaku” that already had been in progress during the Wartime through the investigation of those two works.
著者
渡邊 麻里
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.72, pp.1-21, 2021-06-15 (Released:2021-06-29)

Currently, a simultaneous audio commentary “Earphone-Guide” is provided in Kabuki performances through earphones to explain the synopsis, casting, costumes, tools, and Kabuki-specific conventions in a timely manner as the drama progresses. Officially introduced at the Kabuki-za Theater in November 1975, it was an epoch-making attempt in the history of theater, providing commentary for native speakers of Japanese. Since its introduction, it has been used by many spectators, but, while it occupies an important position in Kabuki, several pros and cons have been identified since its introduction, and even now, 45 years later.Based on this situation, we will clarify the background and origin of the Earphone-Guide, describe what the Japanese commentary in Kabuki comprises, and examine the relationship between the audience and the commentary during the viewing experience by comparing it with the announcer of radio stage broadcasts. In recent years, research on the relationship between theater and new media has been progressing, both visually and audibly. By discussing the Earphone-Guide, I hope to help explore the possibilities of the use of “guide” in theaters in the future.
著者
中野 正昭
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.41, pp.83-96, 2003-12-15 (Released:2018-12-14)

AMEYA Norimizu is a changing artist. In the 1980s, he was a man of the theater: a dramatist, a director, a stage and sound designer, and an actor. In the 90s, he was an artist of the postmodern art. Since 1999, he has been an owner of a shop of rare animals. Ameya says that those activities he has been doing, including dealing with rare animals, are all for what he thinks is theatre.He wants to show the reality of a living body by means of theatre and technology. For example, in Skin#2 Buffalo Mix (1989), Ameya and his theatre group “M.M.M” made an exciting collaboration of living actors with a machine, which was like the “machine” of SRL of Mark Pauline. It was, in a sense, a theatre performance of Japanese cyber-punk. He was interested in the contemporary noise music and liked to use it in his theatre performances.But Ameya's activities are not completely different from Japanese theatre before him. He took some suggestions for his sound effect from KARA Jyuro's Jyokyo Gekijo. In Ameya's theatre Kara's sound effect was mixed with noise music, and it produced a unique effect of Ameya's own.
著者
堤 春恵
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.66, pp.107-120, 2018-06-30 (Released:2018-06-30)

With the end of its isolation in 1854 and fall of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1868, Japan moved towards westernization. Following the new government's policy, an ambitious theater manager, Morita Kan'ya, became involved in an attempt to westernize Kabuki. In 1879, Kan'ya produced a new Kabuki play, The Wanderers' Strange Story: A Western Kabuki at his theater in Tokyo. This unusual Kabuki play dramatized the progress of a Japanese group travelling throughout the United States and Europe. In Paris, the main characters visited the Opéra and watched The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein by Offenbach, Daughter of the Regiment by Donizetti, and The Daughter of Madame Angot by Lecoq.Unfortunately, this production was a commercial failure because the Japanese audience, who had never witnessed any theater other than traditional Kabuki, could not appreciate operatic singing.A troupe known as the Royal English Opera Company performed these operas as plays within a play. The troupe's leader, Howard Vernon, and the prima-donna Elcia May were from Australia. Before coming to Japan, the troupe visited British colonies. After their productions in Tokyo, Vernon and May returned to Australia and in 1880 appeared on stage at one of Melbourne's major theaters. Newspaper reviews indicated that their performance was well received in British colonies including Melbourne, Australia's theatrical center.
著者
竹田 恵子
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.58, pp.73-89, 2014 (Released:2017-01-06)

This paper about performance piece S/N (1994) created by artist group Dumb Type investigates the citations of previous works by Dumb Type members or other artists. Then, it illustrates the structure of the performance piece by using interviews about the creation process and the recorded performance analysis of S/N.In previous reviews, Dumb Type was reported to value the equality among the members in terms of participation in the creative process. In addition, Dumb Type was said to prevent the control by a single author/director on the performance piece. At first sight, hybridity, or decentralization, is the initial characteristic of S/N. The performance's elements are juxtaposed on the stage, including texts, moving bodies, synthesized music, lighting, performers' dialogue, and the projection of moving images.In consequence, however, citations and the original creation portion on S/N are aligned along two main themes consistently. S/N has a structure in which similar parts repeat and develop.The relationship between the creation of S/N and FURUHASHI Teiji, who informed his close friends about his HIV-positive status just before the creation, will need to be investigated further.
著者
熊谷 知子
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.62, pp.51-66, 2016-05-30 (Released:2016-06-07)

In my previous research note “OSANAI Kaoru's religious faith and that time” (2015), I argued that OSANAI had followed several religions in his life. Around 1900, he briefly became a Christian. Thereafter, he was closely involved with new religions: Shiseiden around 1916 and Omoto-kyo around 1920. Whereas he held these faiths temporarily, OSANAI was interested in spiritualism throughout his life. It is necessary to consider this tendency in his theatrical work. This paper discusses OSANAI Kaoru's play Daiichi no Sekai (The First World), focusing on his religious faith and spiritualism. This play was written for a Kabuki actor, ICHIKAWA Sadanji II, performed by the Sadanji troupe in 1921. Until now, Daiichi no Sekai has been explored only in terms of its mysticism or symbolism, however this paper focuses on its connection to an autobiographical novel by a devout Christian: Shisen wo Koete (Before the Dawn) by KAGAWA Toyohiko. It is important to note that OSANAI had directed Shisen wo Koete, dramatized by the Shimpa (the 'new school'), in the month prior to the opening performance of Daiichi no Sekai. Specifically, this paper focuses on the reflection of OSANAI's feelings in the characters of Yamanaka, the man of the house, and Shimamura, the orphan houseboy.
著者
譲原 晶子
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.55, pp.1-19, 2012

<p>The "ballet d'action", meaning the "ballet with a narrative or a story", was a genre of ballet that emerged in the 18th century. This genre originally sought for becoming a "drama". Although it later underwent such a change that it became, by the age of the Romanticism, a sort of spectacle, and although its narratives then came to be seen merely as pretexts or "texts as excuse" for the spectacle, what had been achieved in the earlier stage of the development of "ballet d'action" seems to have had significant influence on dramatic dances which flourished in the twentieth century. So I question, in this paper, how and in which way the early "ballet d'action" was able to construct itself as a kind of "mute drama", without ignoring, of course, also the spectacular aspect of it.</p><p>I first examine articles of performance reviews at that time to find pertinent successful pieces and then analyze the scenarios. As a result, the following observations are possible. Main characters of "ballet d'action" are often getting absorbed in something: a device that creates such situations where they can remain totally mute. For instance, they are getting absorbed in a game of love (as is seen in many pieces) or artistic creation (as in <i>Pygmalion</i> or <i>Apelles et Campaspe</i>), or getting self-absorbed as in <i>Dansomanie</i> or <i>Somnambule</i>. At the same time, certain inner conflicts of the characters undoubtedly accompany these absorptions. Further, those actions of being absorbed in something are often superposed on swiftly changing, spectacular "tableaus" on the stage. Consequently, the main characters' inner conflicts can stand out in contrast to the balletic background.</p>
著者
譲原 晶子
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.55, pp.1-19, 2012

<p>The "ballet d'action", meaning the "ballet with a narrative or a story", was a genre of ballet that emerged in the 18th century. This genre originally sought for becoming a "drama". Although it later underwent such a change that it became, by the age of the Romanticism, a sort of spectacle, and although its narratives then came to be seen merely as pretexts or "texts as excuse" for the spectacle, what had been achieved in the earlier stage of the development of "ballet d'action" seems to have had significant influence on dramatic dances which flourished in the twentieth century. So I question, in this paper, how and in which way the early "ballet d'action" was able to construct itself as a kind of "mute drama", without ignoring, of course, also the spectacular aspect of it.</p><p>I first examine articles of performance reviews at that time to find pertinent successful pieces and then analyze the scenarios. As a result, the following observations are possible. Main characters of "ballet d'action" are often getting absorbed in something: a device that creates such situations where they can remain totally mute. For instance, they are getting absorbed in a game of love (as is seen in many pieces) or artistic creation (as in <i>Pygmalion</i> or <i>Apelles et Campaspe</i>), or getting self-absorbed as in <i>Dansomanie</i> or <i>Somnambule</i>. At the same time, certain inner conflicts of the characters undoubtedly accompany these absorptions. Further, those actions of being absorbed in something are often superposed on swiftly changing, spectacular "tableaus" on the stage. Consequently, the main characters' inner conflicts can stand out in contrast to the balletic background.</p>

3 1 1 0 OA 戦時演劇研究

著者
日比野 啓 林 廣親 山下 純照
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.49, pp.3-25, 2009 (Released:2018-01-12)

This paper first addresses the general academic inertia in the research on Japanese theatre during the Fifteen-Years War (1931-1945). A few shingeki-centered studies have emphasized the government's repression of theatre, but more detailed, evidence-based examination (rather than emotionally charged accusations based on limited experiences on the part of “victims”) will reveal the complex and complicated situation in which Japanese theatre was bogged down from 1931 through 1945.Second, it redefines Ozasa Yoshio's argument that the “National Theatre” (kokumin engeki) concept was not a detestably successful example of the nation's cultural control but a failed enterprise broadly supported by theatre practitioners who were encouraged by the nation's first attempt to support theatre. The National Theatre concept was so abstract and vague that government official, critics and scholars, shingeki people, and production companies could put their different ideals and plans on it, with the result that it failed to provide a unified vision of the National Theatre, whether it was based on shingeki or kabuki.Third, it proposes a new perspective on mobile theatre. The “uncontrollability” of theatre arts was most tellingly reflected in the realities of Japanese mobile theatre during World War II. These realities should be further examined not only by excavating unfound documents told by the performers and the leaders of the mobile theatre, but also by exploring the experiences of audiences in villages and factories.Lastly, the paper concludes that unlike the Nazi Theatre, which Japanese government official and scholars set an example of, Japanese theatre during the Fifteen-Years War was not so organized or unified that the government could control its broad activities. Although research on the influences of the Nazi theatre policies on Japan's National Theatre concept should be continued, they are expected to be limited ones.
著者
坂本(平敷) 尚子
出版者
日本演劇学会
雑誌
演劇学論集 日本演劇学会紀要 (ISSN:13482815)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.46, pp.5-23, 2008 (Released:2018-01-12)

The house of man (Jinrui-kan, 1976) is a play written by an Okinawan author, CHINEN Seishin (1941-). The house of man is founded on historical facts of modern Okinawa; Osaka Exposition case (1903), a prohibition of using native Okinawan language (1879-), and the experience of ground war (1944-1945), etc. We find many tales and historical episodes in this play, there are even tragic. Additionally, the play is written in three kinds of languages; standard Japanese, Okinawan-Japanese called Uchina-Yamato-guchi that is spoken in modern Okinawa, and native Okinawan (Ryukyuan). It is sufficiently sensitive to Okinawa's dilemma.This paper illustrates characteristics of the play, and points out its critical opinions on discrimination and resistless people of Okinawa. Although the play could be interpreted as a tragedy, it may contain a good deal of humor, and appeal to the readers (or audience) all the more on account of it. The House of Man has been partly revised two times. The first revised edition (1978) gave a vivid representation of Okinawa of the day. And the second (2003) describes its recognition of separation of politics and the people of Okinawa. Anyway, CHINEN laughs away Okinawa's fears, and raises a question about passive obedience of Okinawa.