著者
三好 彰
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.2007, no.39, pp.59-79, 2006 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
32

The first printed Dictionary of English and Japanese Languages was compiled by Hori Tatsnoskay and published in 1862, and it was revised by Horikosi Kamenoskay in 1866. The dictionary was a historical landmark in the Japanese English academia.It has been generally considered that all vocabulary entries of the dictionary had been obtained from “A new pocket dictionary of the English and Dutch languages by H. Picard, 1857 (Picard-1857)”, and the Dutch words of Picard-1857 had been translated into Japanese using several preceding dictionaries of Dutch and Japanese languages. But precise investigation of names of birds makes it clear that some English dictionaries had been used to translate names of birds into Japanese, because there are eleven groups of words in Picard-1857 whose English words that have an identical bird name in Dutch are translated in different Japanese.Moreover, Hori Tatsnoskay got three Japanese words of birds from corresponding Dutch words which have been found not in the Picard-1857, but in the Picard's dictionary of the first edition published in 1843 (Picard-1843).The dictionary revised by Horikoshi Kamenoskay has two English words of birds which are not found in either Picard-1843 or Picard-1857. Since more than half names of birds have been updated by Horikoshi Kamenoskay, the dictionary is good enough for general users.
著者
石原 千里
出版者
Historical Society of English Studies in Japan
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
no.33, pp.13-27, 2000

Based on the extracts of 4 letters in the <I>Spirit of Missions</I> quoted from the <I>New York Journal of Commerce</I>, the author has already reported on the teaching of English by Henry Wood, and pointed out his great contribution to the history of both Christianity and English studies in Japan.<BR>The present paper deals mainly with the study of 3 out of the 4 letters in the <I>New York Journal of Commerce</I>, for which Henry Wood acted as a correspondent during his service on the U. S. Ship Powhatan. He also sent many letters on other subjects. The 3 letters concerned here contained important information unquoted in the <I>Spirit of Missions</I>. Some examples are as follows. Each of the 3 letters was headed "MY SCHOOL AND (MY) SCHOLARS IN JAPAN." With no knowledge of Dutch or Japanese, Wood utilized some English-Dutch dictionaries and one or two Dutch-Japanese dictionaries, and also used the primitive language-the language of signs-to define particular words. He was confident that the Japanese were hopeful for Christianity, and that the method of conducting them to Christianity, under its prohibition, would be by teaching them English.<BR>Henry Wood was born on April 10, 1796, in Louden, NH. He received a Master of Arts degree from Dartmouth College in 1822, and was a tutor at Dartmouth College in 1822-23. After studying divinity at Princeton Theological Seminary for about one year in 1823-24, he was a senior tutor of Latin and Greek at Hampden-Sydney College in 1824-25. He was ordained in the Congregational Church in 1826 and in the Presbyterian Church before 1856. He was U. S. Consul at Beirut, Syria from 1853-56. He was commissioned Chaplain of U. S. Navy on September 11, 1856. He was on the U. S. Ship Powhatan in the Chinese and Japanese seas in 1858-60. In 1858 he sent two letters to the authority of the Reformed Dutch Church of the United States, appealing to establish its mission at Nagasaki. He taught English to the Japanese at Nagasaki in 1858 and on the Powhatan in 1860. He was stationed at the Naval Asylum in Philadelphia in 1863. He died in Philadelphia on October 9, 1873.
著者
篠田 左多江
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.2001, no.33, pp.105-119, 2000 (Released:2010-01-25)
参考文献数
32

Only a few ariticles and essays on Isen Kanno have been found since his death. They are Eitaro Ishigaki, “Forty-year Vagabond Life in America” (1952), Dengo Matsubara, “Baron Kanno” (1954), Shinsui Kawai, “Isen and Gertrude Kanno” (1955), Tamotsu Mirayama, “An Issei Poet Who Composed English” (1961), Ippei Nomoto, “A Vanished Star” (1973) and Ayako Ishigaki, “A Love Artist Who Crossed the Ocean” (1988). Almost all of them have no reference to Kanno's life, from his birth to death and his literary achievements.In my first essay on Isen Kanno, published in 1994, his life from birth to the days he lived in Joaquin Miller's heights were made clear. In this second essay, the latter half of his life will be revealed.In 1915 Kanno went to New York and stayed in Edwin Markham's residence. He tried to translate Markham's works into Japanese and write biography of Jack London. Reading a lot of books every day in N. Y. Public Library, he then began translating Omar Khayyam's Rubaiyat into Japanese using a style of Japanese popular folk song sung in Edo Era. But to his disappointment he could not publish them. He also wrote many articles for Japanese newspaper joining the Japanese immigrants' literary group.In 1929 he and his wife, who left him and went to New York with her lover 14 years ago, finally came back to him. Kanno was very glad to be with his wife again. He went back to San Francisco with her and lived in Nichiren Church in Japan Town.Then Mr. and Mrs. Kanno went to Japan. He expected to get his works published there. His wife, sculptress, had exhibitions at some department stores in Tokyo. At that time militarism seized Japan and displaying nude statues was prohibited. Kanno made efforts to publish his works in vain. After two years they returned to the U. S.As soon as they arrived in San Francisco, his wife passed away of a sudden fever on August 14th, 1937. His beloved wife's death threw him into despair. Four months later he died of pneumonia.His manuscripts of poetry, translation and essays were kept in Nichiren Church. On December 7th, 1941, war broke out between Japan and the U. S. and Japanese Americans were forced to evacuate and sent to concentration camps. All his manuscripts were lost during this period of confusion.Isen Kanno was a determined man who made up his mind to live in the U. S. all his life, marrying to a caucasian artist and wrote in English. He was different from the most Japanese immigrants whose purpose were making money and returning to Japan as rich persons. But war prevented him from being what he expected to be.
著者
長岡 祥三
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1996, no.28, pp.57-71, 1995 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
68

Theodora was born in 1870 at London, the eldest daugher of Saburo Ozaki and his English wife Bathia Catherine Morrison. Mr. Ozaki came back to Japan, leaving his wife and three daughters in London. He later divorced Bathia according to Japanese law, but she remained his wife under the laws of England. By mutual agreement, she sent her eldest daughter Theodora to Japan to be taken care of by her father.In May of 1887, Theodora came to Japan at the age of sixteen. A few years later she became independent of her father, working as a private tutor and an English teacher at some girls' schools. In 1891 Mrs. Hugh Fraser, the wife of a British minister, sympathized with Theodora and asked her to came to the legation as her private secretary and companion.Theodora spent several happy years with Mrs. Fraser, but the latter had to go back to her home in Italy due to her husband's death in 1894. Theodora followed her the next year and enjoyed many pleasant days with her and her family. She met there Francis Marion Crawford, the well-known novelist and the brother of Mrs. Fraser. He encouraged her to write a book of fairy tales she had told sometimes in the family circle.After an absence of four years she returned to Japan at the beginning of 1899 to teach English at Keio Gijuku. Her first book “The Japanese Fairy Book” appeared in 1903 and achieved great success. She wrote three more books of old Japanese stories which also gained fine reputations.In 1905 she married the famous politician Yukio Ozaki who was the Mayor of Tokyo at that time. Thereafter she lived a happy life with him until she died from an illness at London in 1932 during her visit with her husband and her two daughters.
著者
潟岡 孝昭
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1970, no.2, pp.144-156, 1970-09-30 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
17

同志社英学校の開校当初の状態については, 既に同志社大学関係者によって詳細に述べ尽され, 現在もなお同志社社史々料編集所において調査されており, 私などの卑見を述べるべき筈のものではありますまいが, たまたまその当時の2・3の史料を見出す機会を得たので, それらを紹介すると共に卑見の一端を述べ諸賢のご指導を仰ぎたい。
著者
水野 義一
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1972, no.4, pp.91-103, 1972-04-20 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
41
著者
遠藤 智比古
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1991, no.23, pp.41-55, 1990 (Released:2010-05-07)
参考文献数
26

Most current dictionaries say that “Kirin” is a correct Japanese translation of giraffe, which is an Arabic word meaning “fast walker.” Japanese and Chinese words usually use the same Chinese characters, but the Chinese word for giraffe is Changjinglu (長頸鹿) “long-necked deer”, whereas Kirin is a mythical animal that traditionally appeared in connection with the arrival of a saint.In the Ming dynasty, Kirin was used in the meaning of giraffe in China, some of which passages the writer found in 'The History of Ming (明史).'But as more people saw giraffes, they became more aware of the differences between Kirin and giraffe.In 1860, Gempo Mitsukuri tried translating the Latin name Camelopardalis (camel-panther) into 'Hyoda.'But in 1907 when the first giraffe was actually imported to Japan and called a Kirin by Dr. Chiyomatsu Ishikawa (first director of Ueno Zoo), “Kirin” became the official word in Japan.
著者
出来 成訓
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1977, no.9, pp.155-167, 1976-09-01 (Released:2010-05-07)
参考文献数
17
著者
池田 哲郎
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1983, no.15, pp.195-215, 1982 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
7

Darwin's “Origin of Species” was introduced into Japan for the first time by Morse, Edward Sylvester, an American professor of biology in Tokyo University, Dept. of Scienece in 1879; twenty years after the publication of the original.Morse gave publicity to various fields of society like a university extension. His lectures in Tokyo University was published in Japanese after six years by his student Isikawa Tiyomatu.Since then in conseqence of the Darwin's views adopted by most Japanese scientist and which will ultimately, as in every other case, be followed by Japanese intelligentsia who are not scientific.I am going to write a brief history of Darwinism in Japan for last one hundred years, 1 st translation, books, essays, both natural and social sides.Bibliography of Darwinism in Japan is added as an appendix.

1 0 0 0 OA 奈良英学史抄

著者
中川 良和
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1978, no.10, pp.121-134, 1977-09-01 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
11
著者
手塚 竜麿
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1975, no.7, pp.105-112, 1974-09-30 (Released:2009-09-16)
著者
関口 英男
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1996, no.28, pp.29-41, 1995 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
5

I discovered several old Japanese tombs even in the North East of England. Some were tombs of Japanese students who died accidentally without seeing their homeland again.Bysaku Fukao was one of the unfortunate. He fell from the dock at Middlesbrough and drowned at the age of 18, on 14th November 1873. He was engaged as an articled pupil with Dixon and Company, Shipbuilding firm and studied at Walworth House College, Darlington at the same time. He was buried in Darlington West Cemetry.Katsu Iwamoto was another. His tomb was found in St. John's Church Cemetry in Newcastle. His name was listed in the “List of Students” of Durham University Calendar 1877-78. He was a naval cadet when he was ordered by the Ministry of Imperial Japanese Navy to study gun manufacturing. But unfortunately he contracted tuberculosis and died four months later at the age of 20, on 21st June 1877.With these predecessors' great effort the modern industrial Japan was created.
著者
池だ 哲郎
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1969, no.1, pp.1-14, 1969 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
53
著者
蒲原 宏
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1985, no.17, pp.67-76, 1984-10-01 (Released:2010-02-22)
参考文献数
13
著者
小林 信行
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.2007, no.39, pp.97-115, 2006 (Released:2009-09-16)
参考文献数
28

In 1903, Hirata was sent to go to England for three years as a student of the Department of Education in order to study “English and a Method of Teaching English”.On the 21st of Fubruary, he left Yokohama for England, taking with him words of encouragement and farewell gifts presented by his teachers and his students. He arrived in London at the end of April. While staying in Japanese Cosulate, he saw the sights of London and sometimes visited the museums. He also frequented the theaters with his friends to see the plays such as “Much Ado About Nothing, ” “Dante, ” “Sapho, ” “Tristram and Iseult”.He met Mr. Osman Edwards again whom he had maintained a close friendship with in Japan five years before. When he was in Japan to study Japanese plays and actors, he was accompanied by Hirata to the plays (Noh and Kabuki) and sometimes translated his essays of “On Japanese Plays” into Japanese so that Edwards could contribute to Japanese magazines.This time, Edwards welcomed Hirata warmly, showing him around London to see the art museums and theaters. He often took Hirata to the Playgoer's Club.Hirata also visited Hogetu Shimamura. Shimamura had been staying in England for a year as a student from Waseda University and began a friendship with him in London. Before long Hirata decided to go and study at Oxford University and moved there. Hirata's association with Hogetu in Oxford continued until he left for Germany at the end of July in 1904. The state of their association can be seen in “Diary from March 8, 1902” written by Hogetu himself. Hirata associated with Japanese students in Oxford with an introduction from Hogetu. In October he began to present himself at the lectures of Dr. H. Sweet, Prof. Walter Raleigh, Prof. A.S. Napier, Lecturer E.de Selincourt at Merton, Magdalen, Balliol College and so forth.
著者
海江田 進
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1974, no.6, pp.35-43, 1973-09-30 (Released:2009-09-16)
著者
川村 ハツエ
出版者
日本英学史学会
雑誌
英学史研究 (ISSN:03869490)
巻号頁・発行日
vol.1994, no.26, pp.1-16, 1993 (Released:2009-10-07)
参考文献数
11

It was in 1888 thatTHE OLD BAMBOO-HEWER'S STORY (Taketorimonogatari) was translated into English for the first time and published in London by F. V. Dickins. Eight years later, in 1906, he revised it completely and included it in hisPRIMITIVE & MEDIAEVAL JAPANESE TEXTS. In the preface he wrote, “I desire here to acknowledge my great indebtedness to the writings of Dr. Aston, Prof. B. H. Chamberlain, Dr. Karl Florenz and Sir Ernest Satow : to my friend, Mr. Minakata Kumagusu.” Kumagusu stayed in London from 1892 to 1900. During his stay, he met F. V. Dickins, then registrar of University of London. According to Kumagusu's diary, Dickins showed him his translation ofTAKETORIMONOGATARIand asked for his opinion. On reading it, Kumagusu criticised it severely from his point of view as a Japanese. The diary says Dickins got very angry, because he was proud of his rendering. However, Dickins accepted Kumagusu's helpful advice. It took him eight years to revise it thoroughly. This shows that Dickins was fascinated by the story of Kaguyahime, simple, graceful and genuinely Japanese.